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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN2 5
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English 10
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
today. madam president, across the country, americans are lamenting that lack of progress in negotiations to avoid a massive tax increase on middle-class families -- and i really share that frustration. consider yesterday's failure, the disabilities convention at the hands of the tea party. this shouldn't have been a battle, but extreme elements of the republican party picked a fight where there was nothing to fight about. 38 republicans voted against the convention, including several who are on record supporting it, even cosponsors of it. this treaty already ratified by 125 countries would hold foreign nations to the same high standard of treatment that the united states already maintains for people of disabilities. and it would sative american citizens traveling and working abroad, and that's hundreds of thousands of people right now. the treaty has the support of veterans groups, disability groups from around the country, virtually all of them. it wouldn't cost the taxpayers a single penny. it wouldn't require any changes to existing united states law, and the issue is
- and you can be english. (narrator) sculpture made him famous, his celebrity enshrined in wax at madame tussaud's. other celebrities bought his works and enjoyed his company. (dorothy kosinski) i actually think that one has to consider quite seriously a very intriguing dilemma, and that is whether an artist's sense of direction and value and worth is that potentially obscured by fame? (narrator) henry moore was born in the mining town of castleford in 1898. his career began in 1921 when he left yorkshire with a scholarship to study at the royal college of art in london, a bastion of academic formalism. but he found his real inspiration on the other side of london at the british museum. he visited twice a week for years, drawing objects from the museum's vast ethnographic collection, and drawing inspiration from them that would hava lifelong impact on his work. (henry morre) primitive art makes a straightforward statement. its primary concern is with the elemental and its simplicity comes from a direct and strong feeling, which is very different from being simple for the sake of being si
a question. i do maim madam chairman have questions i would like to submit to the secretary and directer fugate. i don't want to take my time here. with your permission, i'll submit the question and you can get the answers back to us. i want to focus now on not just fundings needing for recovery porks -- portions of the recovery, but i think there's a common theme throughout the morning's testimony by the various senators. it is that how do beget beyond just basic of recovery. to and restoration to really the mitigations aspects? and kind of challenge that we're looking there relative to this what turn out to be an inextraordinary cause when you look at the map that was presented here in terms of the extent of this storm, the population that lives within that red zone, and purple zone, and the density of construction businesses and et. cetera, et. cetera, et. cetera. we're talking about an enormous amount of money and mitigation that would be necessary to bring us to the so-called 21st century protection from what appears to be ever increasingly the devastating storms. we are not talking
the subject. overwhelming support for the repeal of the higher tax cuts. any questions? >> madam leader, the response from the publicans today was instantaneous. mr. cantor just finished saying that they were not going to raise rates. what is your response to that? given that line in the sand, where does this process stand? >> let me say that there are three elements to this -- growth, reduction in spending, and raising revenue. we have voted for -- the democrats have voted for over $1 trillion in cuts and spending. that was part of the budget control act. that is part of how we should go forward. you cannot speak about reducing the deficit without talking about raising revenue. i think the president has taken his message to the american. i hope the republicans will listen to that. in the republican caucus -- i'm usually the last person to speak -- i know many members of them are ready to vote for middle income tax cuts. then mckinley the subject of rates and all the rest of that for next year -- and then we can be the subject of rates and all the rest of that for next year and whatever
, madam president and i yield. .. >> at 9 p.m., craig whitney sits down with the former president of the brady campaign to prevent gun violence to discuss the book, "living with guns: a liberal's case for the second amendment." watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv, and for a complete schedule visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last ni
incidentally has its own budget shortfall. madam chairman, as your reference, we seem to be entering an age of increasingly violent storms. at think we really have to think carefully about whether and how to rebuild and locations we know of vulnerable and likely to be hit again which means as we go forward we have to take some vision and think about how we replace critical infrastructure. for instance, during each of the three storms in connecticut in the past year. we have most seriously been impacted by a long-term power outages as a result of our aging electrical distribution system. therefore i hope we will use this opportunity to up some power lines underground move measures of stations away from the store. other mitigation projects include front -- want protection , rhoda improvements, gardening or relocation. the estimated cost for similar projects, and towns, and infrastructure, estimated by our gunners office at $3 billion. the failure to adequately fund mitigation and resilient efforts will only lead to greater federal spending in the future as extreme weather events, including an
than i'd like to be taken. there have been no constant flip-flops, madam. >> so is this a question that we should be asking the obama administration about syria? >> well, you remember, randi, that president clinton was really angry with me when i was asking that question from sarajevo. the fact of the matter is the question didn't prompt intervention but there was intervention more than a year later and it stopped the war and the president enacted a peace settlement and the war stopped and peace still endures in bosnia. i think the issue of syria raises some very important questions. president clinton himself just earlier this year said that the longer it goes without being stopped, the bigger the chance of bad actors getting involved. that is precisely what's happened, randi. that is one more reason that the administration is reluctant to intervene, because now it's not just the ordinary rebellion that it started out as with people demanding reform. it is now being joined by all sorts of jihadists and extremists. al qaeda type affiliates. and all sorts of other types. and this is
as well. so, madam president, the hour is getting late, both figuratively and actually. we don't have much te to settle an issue that will affect the economy of this country. and last but not least, i am sure the president does not want on his watch to have a calamity like this happen, and i don't want on my watch as one who is leaving the senate this year for this to be the last thing that happen on my watch, and i don't think anyone here is going to benefit from a calamity happening in this country's economy, even for a few days, because it just looks like we can't govern, and it's time to realize that on a bipartisan basis, we can do some things that won't be universally liked and it won't be liked by everyone in this room or anyone in this room 100% because we're not going to get everything that we think is right. but we can move our country forward. we can help everyone in this country, every taxpayer, but we're not going to raise taxes to spend more. we should be saying okay, if there's going to be a threshold that pays more taxes, they should know it's going to bring down the defici
recognized for five minutes. >> thank you, chairman garrett. thank you ranking member, madam waters and mr. gensler and mr. cook, the witnesses. i want to remind my colleagues of the importance of cooperation and collaboration with our international partners. i believe the u.s. should demonstrate our global leadership by raising our financial standards and not entering into a race to the bottom of sorts of banking standards. i also believe that the provisions of dodd-frank that were in place five years ago would not have faced, we wouldn't have faced the economic crises we are just beginning to crawl out of. so i'm very reluctant to carve out more exceptions or exemptions to dodd-frank before rules are fully put in place to fully implement the law or without more speculation that could go wrong. my colleague, peter king, would have us suspend enforcement of dodd-frank's volcker rule until our international partners have instituted their own regulations addressing proprietary trading. as i mentioned in my opening statement, i strongly believe that the u.s. should lead by example and not wai
him famous, his celebrity enshrined in wax at madame tussaud's. other celebrities bought his works and enjoyed his company. (dorothy kosinski) i actually think that one has to consider quite seriously a very intriguing dilemma, and that is whether an artist's sense of direction and value and worth is that potentially obscured by fame? (narrator) henry moore was born in the mining town of castleford in 1898. his career began in 1921 when he left yorkshire with a scholarship to study at the royal college of art in london, a bastion of academic formalism. but he found his real inspiration on the other side of london at the british museum. he visited twice a week for years, drawing objects from the museum's vast ethnographic collection, and drawing inspiration from them that would have a lifelong impact on his work. (henry morre) primitive art makes a straightforward statement. its primary concern is with the elemental and its simplicity comes from a direct and strong feeling, which is very different from being simple for the sake of being simple, which only leads to emptiness. (narrat
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10